comments

“In God We Trust” sign to hang in City Council Chambers

Sign to be paid for by donors
By: Sara Seyydin
-A +A
City council approved a sign with the phrase “In God We Trust” to hang in the City Council Chambers, Monday night. The sign was approved on the condition that it would be paid for by donations from the community and appear in the same font as it does on the dollar bill. City councilman Mike Holmes, who first proposed the idea, said in the meeting that while he did receive a couple of negative e-mails, public response to the sign was mostly positive. Holmes said one resident even offered to donate the funds for the sign. “Colfax has already taken action on this. I read in the Auburn Journal that most people are in favor and I haven’t talked to anyone in the community against it,” Holmes said. Mayor Bill Kirby abstained from voting on the proposal, while the rest of the council voted for its approval. Kirby said he didn’t have a problem with the sign because in a similar case the 9th Circuit U.S. Court deemed such signs constitutional. Kirby said he was concerned about being connected with the organization promoting these signs though, started by Bakersfield City Councilwoman Jacquie Sullivan. City councilmen Kevin Hanley said in the meeting he was supportive of the sign. He said the phrase would serve as a visible reminder to elected officials that they were not all-knowing. “I fully support this proposal. It shows our rights come from God and not man,” Hanley said. Reach Sara Seyydin at saras@goldcountrymedia.com. ______________________________________________________ Did you know? According the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, the national motto “In God We Trust” was adopted for use on paper money in 1957. Despite various court challenges, it continues to appear on U.S. currency. “This use of the national motto has been challenged in court many times over the years that it has been in use, and has been consistently upheld by the various courts of this country, including the U.S. Supreme Court as recently as 1977,” said a statement on the bureau’s website. “The Department of the Treasury and the Department of Justice intend to actively defend against challenges to the use of the national motto.”