comments

PROFITS OR PATRIOTISM?

Reader Input Online
-A +A
I understand the consternation in the health care and health insurance boardrooms across the USA. They are concerned with the demise of their customer base, or, more properly, the profits available from the customer base. They must remain businesses…..else wise, all their jobs, janitor to CEO, are in jeopardy. The PROPER civilizing of the Earth must necessarily pass along the path of growth past stability, to decline, and then to proper stability; that is, if the collective nations of the World manage properly their respective assets and their fellow travelers here on Earth. This creates a dilemma for the insurance sector’s corporate model. Should they shrink potential profits slowly to match their customer base’s real needs and accept the “inevitable,” or should they raise their profits (their “take”) to the point of breaking their customers’ pocketbooks like those many late, lamented companies that died in the Economic Bust these last few months. In other words, are health care insurers and providers on the brink? Our “talented” CEO’s who provide their investors and their highly paid employees with profits shouldn’t have to bat an eye to make that decision. Brink or not, today, they must move abroad to the developing nations and build the markets for their future profit-making. It’s the only sane thing to do, and as we see from GM, who didn’t do it in a sane manner, the choice is not really a choice in a truly competitive World. I’d suggest that the CEO’s and investors in the health care and insurance businesses bite the bullet and work long hours to develop their future markets abroad in places like China and India and Indonesia rather than to break the economic backs of loyal American Citizens who have collectively provided the profits to build the health sector businesses to their current profit levels. If they plan and manage WISELY AND PROPERLY, the WHOLE WORLD is their oyster! Face it, the American Oyster is gradually becoming a barnacle on potential profits. Lynn Johnson, Weimar