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Teichert in partnership to buy 64-year-old Chevreaux Aggregates of Auburn, Meadow Vista

By: Gus Thomson, Journal Staff Writer
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A stalwart in business and the community for 64 years, Chevreaux Aggregates is in the process of changing hands. In an agreement that has yet to be finalized, the Chevreaux Family Trust would sell the business to a partnership consisting of Sacramento’s Teichert Materials and Rocklin’s Western Care Construction Co. Dana Davis, Teichert Materials president, said the partnership – Green Vista Holdings – has the option to purchase Chevreaux Aggregates and is currently doing due diligence before a sale is complete. During the current option period, Teichert has been responsible for managing the plant, Davis said. The change in management has meant the recent closure of the Chevreaux office on Highway 49. Davis said it could be several months before a transfer of the Chevreaux properties are made. Teichert, with roots into the 19th century in the Sacramento area, is actually older than Chevreaux, which was founded by the late Joe Chevreaux in 1946. Chevreaux entrenched itself in the foothills, particularly Auburn and Meadow Vista, with participation – and free concrete – in many major community projects. Davis said that feeling of community is also felt by Teichert and Western Care, a family-owned company founded in Auburn in 1960. Davis said he couldn’t comment on how Green Vista Holdings would operate the Chevreaux business if it took it over because the sale had not been completed. Joe Chevreaux, who died in 1999, established himself as a beloved community leader and respected business owner. Six years after his death, Teichert and Chevreaux Ready Mix embarked on a controversial attempt to use the Meadow Vista aggregate plant on the Bear River as an asphalt plant to supply Interstate 80 construction work. That proposal ran into a hornet’s nest of opposition and establishment of a group – Meadow Vista Protection – to fight it. President Laurie Sweeney declined to comment on the possible sale because Meadow Vista Protection was still in litigation over the plant’s legality. Meadow Vista resident Tyrone Gorre, an opponent of the plant, said that Teichert and Western Care would inherit concerns over the asphalt plant issue, as well as a demand to gain more public access to the site, which straddles the Bear River. A recent award of a $1.6 million Placer County contract to Teichert for asphalt concrete overlay work this spring is “a red flag,” Gorre said. He noted that one of the projects is for about a mile of overlay on nearby Placer Hills Road. Gorre said that area residents could likely accept continued use of the Meadow Vista site as a gravel plant but the potential new owners would find it more difficult to win acceptance of an asphalt plant. Chevreaux’s legacy in the community continues to be felt. In 1949, the Mississippi-born business owner spearheaded the reconstruction of James Field, through the cooperation of local contractors. He also led efforts to build swimming pools in Meadow Vista and at the Auburn Recreation Park, pouring the concrete to make both happen. In 1967, Chevreaux stepped up to organize local contractors and gain community support to build LeFebvre Stadium on the Placer High School campus.